What is the Engle Institute?

The Engle Institute is a weeklong continuing education event that was envisioned and made possible by the dream and generosity of Joe R. Engle, a member of the First Presbyterian Church in New York City. The institute is designed to nurture and strengthen the craft of those who preach, ideally weekly, whether in city or suburb, small town, rural community, or other specialized ministries.

Engle Fellows and faculty gather for the week to participate together in the hospitality of the seminar room, the dinner table and the chapel pew. Through hands-on workshops, seminars, tutorials, and conversations, Engle fellows are supported and challenged to seek excellence in their preaching vocations.

Become an Engle Fellow


Apply to be a 2017 Engle Fellow if you want to reconnect vocationally with peers and practice the craft of preaching in the company of colleagues.

June 11- 16, 2017


The Engle Institute begins at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, June 11 and concludes at 11:15 on Friday, June 16.


Because of the generosity of Joe R. Engle,
the fee for the Engle Institute is $175,
inclusive of lodging and meals.


The Engle Institute is for you if…

You are a seminary graduate (M.Div.) who has been preaching for two to eight years.

You are able to attend the entire week of the Engle Institute.

You currently or will soon have regular (weekly) preaching responsibilities.

You wish to nurture or strengthen your preaching vocation.

You have not previously attended the Engle Institute.

Leadership and Faculty

Schedule

2:00 p.m.
REGISTRATION OPENS


4:00 p.m.
ORIENTATION


6:00 p.m.
WELCOME DINNER


7:00 p.m.
OPENING WORSHIP


7:30 a.m.- 8:45 a.m.
BREAKFAST


9:00 a.m.- 10:00 a.m.
CONVOCATION


10:15 a.m.- 12:15 p.m.
MORNING WORKSHOPS


12:15 p.m.- 1:30 p.m.
LUNCH


2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.
AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS


5:30 p.m.- 6:30 p.m.
DINNER (except Wednesday)


7:00 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP (except Wednesday)


7:30 a.m.- 8:45 a.m.
BREAKFAST


9:00 a.m.
CONVOCATION


10:15 a.m.- 11:15 a.m.
CLOSING PROGRAM AND DEBRIEFING


*Please note: Engle fellows are required to participate in the full program, arriving in time for orientation on Sunday and departing after the closing program and debriefing on Friday.

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Peter Henry


Peter Henry has been the pastor of Grosse Pointe Memorial Church for 10 years. Prior to GPMC, Peter was a full-time doctoral student at Princeton Theological Seminary, from which he earned his Ph.D. in homiletics.   Peter has served as an interim associate pastor at Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton, NJ and as an   associate pastor at Myers Park Presbyterian in Charlotte, NC.  A native of the Midwest, Peter is married to Shawn Henry, a librarian and English teacher. They have three children, Attticus, Haven and Whittier. Peter has contributed to the Feasting on the Gospels series and currently serves as an adjunct faculty member at Ecumenical Theological Seminary in Detroit where he teaches an introductory course in worship and an advanced preaching course. He is on the Board of Trustees for Princeton Theological Seminary and also on the alumni executive council. Pastor/Preacher in Residence

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Racquel Lettsome


Raquel St. Clair Lettsome is an Itinerant Elder in the African Methodist Episcopal Church currently serving as Associate Minister at Union A.M.E. Church in Warwick, NY.  She is also the managing partner of Say AMEN! (www.sayamen.org), a digital clearinghouse for preaching, teaching, and worship arts.  For 16 years, Raquel served as the first female Executive Minister of the historic 4000 member St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church in Newark, NJ.  A graduate of Yale University (B.A.) and Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div. and Ph.D.), she is a New Testament scholar whose most recent publications include the commentary essay on Mark’s Gospel in Commentary on the New Testament (Fortress Press);the three pastoral essays for Feasting on the Gospels commentary series (Westminster John Knox); and an essay in More Power in the Pulpit: How America’s Best Black Preachers Prepare Their Sermons.  Racquel is the proud wife of the Rev. Lydell C. Lettsome, M.D. and mother of Tiffany Simone and Luke Charles. Convocation Speaker

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Martin Tel


Martin Tel is the C. F. Seabrook Director of Music at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.  At the seminary Martin conducts the seminary choirs, teaches courses in church music, and administers the music for the daily seminary worship services.  He served as senior editor of Psalms for All Seasons: A Complete Psalter for Worship (Faith Alive, 2012) and on the editorial committee producing a new hymnal for the Christian Reformed Church and Reformed Church in America denominations, Lift Up Your Hearts (June, 2013) . Musician and Worship Leader

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Michael Brothers


Michael A. Brothers is Associate Professor of Speech Communication in Ministry at Princeton Theological Seminary. He holds an M.A. from Northwestern University’s School of Speech, and M.Div., Th.M., and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton Seminary. An ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), Brothers served a congregation for seven years in Danville, Kentucky, where he also was chaplain of Centre College. His teaching and research interests include the relationship between performance studies, aesthetics, narrative, and preaching.

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Rev. Dr. Shauna Hannan


Shauna Hannan is Associate Professor of Homiletics at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary of California Lutheran University in Berkeley, California. She also serves on the Core Doctoral Faculty of the Graduate Theological Union (Berkeley). She received her Ph.D. in practical theology (homiletics) from Princeton Theological Seminary. Dr. Hannan is ordained in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). Dr. Hannan’s current research interests include: preaching as a ministry of the whole congregation, preaching public issues, Latin American homiletical pedagogy, the arts and the craft of preaching (especially working film, short story fiction, music, theatre and photography).

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Adam Hearlson


Adam Hearlson is the Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship and Director of Wilson Chapel at Andover Newton Theological School. Originally from California, Adam received his B.A. from Vanguard University and his MDiv and PhD. from Princeton Theological Seminary. His current research centers on the ways worship has been used within Christian communities as an act of holy subversion. As such, he is currently fascinated with non-conformist puritans, slave spirituals, ancient graffiti, and doctrines of inculturation. His book, The Holy No: Worship as a Subversive Art will be published by Eerdmans in 2017. Adam also co-host of “Technicolor Jesus,” a podcast about movies, preaching and ministry. An ordained minister in the United Church of Christ, Adam has served congregations in Costa Mesa, California; at the Princeton University Chapel; and in Warren, NJ. When not studying, teaching or preaching, Adam shares a life with his wife, Christy (also a minister and scholar) and their two sons. Adam likes to cook and watch NBA basketball.

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Shively Smith

Shively T. J. Smith is associate professor of New Testament at Wesley Theological Seminary. She completed her Ph.D. in New Testament Studies at Emory University and recently published her first book called, Strangers to Family: Diaspora and First Peter’s Invention of God’s Household with Baylor University Press and she is currently writing a commentary on the Second Letter of Peter. Smith has studied at a variety of institutions, including: Fisk University, Candler School of Theology, Columbia Theological Seminary, and even for a short time at Oxford University as an English-Speaking Union Luard Fellow. She has been actively working in ministry for 20 years, entering the ministry at the age of 16 and working with various church organizations and denominations from Baptist, to Pentecostal, Methodist, and non-denominational. Now, she is an ordained itinerant elder in the African Methodist Episcopal Church where she proudly serves as member and resident scholar of Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, DC.

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Nancy Gross


Nancy Lammers Gross is the Arthur Sarell Rudd Associate Professor of Speech Communication in Ministry  at Princeton Theological Seminary. She earned both her M.Div. and Ph.D. from Princeton Seminary. She is a member of the Academy of Homiletics, the National Communication Association/Religious Communication Association, and numerous academic administration professional organizations. Her areas of teaching interest include speech communication, preaching, worship, and hermeneutics. Her publications include the forthcoming book, Women’s Voices and the Practice of Preaching, published by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. An ordained Presbyterian minister, Nancy has served churches in California and New Jersey. She also served for ten years on the Committee on Preparation for Ministry in the New Brunswick Presbytery, four of those years as co-moderator.

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Gerald C. Liu

Gerald Liu is assistant professor of worship and preaching at Princeton Theological Seminary. He earned his BA at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, his MDiv from Emory University (during which time he was also a theological fellow at Georg-August Universität in Göttingen, Germany), and his PhD from Vanderbilt University with a concentration in homiletics and liturgics. He has previously served as a British Methodist Minister in Nottingham, England and as assistant professor of homiletics and worship arts at Drew Theological School.

An ordained United Methodist, he is a minister in residence at Church of the Village, a United Methodist congregation in Manhattan. He is also especially active in the North American Academy of Liturgy and the Academy of Homiletics. In the latter organization, he convenes the Narrative and Imagination workgroup and edits the worship reviews for the online journal Homiletic.

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Y. Joy Harris-Smith

Y. Joy Harris-Smith is a lecturer in the field of Communication & Culture, and most recently the Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Speech at Princeton Theological Seminary.  Dr. Harris-Smith has demonstrated excellence in teaching speech and human communication at Howard University and her scholarship at regional and conferences.  Her most recent publication is Spiritual Health Identity: placing black women’s lives in the center of analysis in “Gender and Diversity Issues in Religious- Based Institutions and Organizations (2015).”

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Rob Hoch


Robert Hoch currently serves as Pastor of the First & Franklin Presbyterian Church in Baltimore, MD. Robert received his call to the city of Baltimore in the summer of 2016, just a year after the Freddie Gray riots. At this critical juncture in the history of race relations and economic inequity in America’s cities, Robert continues the legacy of First & Franklin’s work in social justice through prophetic and socially aware preaching. Before arriving in Baltimore, Robert served as Associate Professor of Homiletics and Worship at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary for thirteen years. His most recent book, By the Rivers of Babylon: Blueprint for a Church in Exile, used communities of faith formed among exiles as a lens for making sense of the church in a post-Christendom era. He publishes biblical commentary for preachers in a variety of forums, including for the Working Preacher website.

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Workshops

Engle Fellows take part in a morning and afternoon workshop each day. Some workshops have four consecutive sessions and some have two.

Morning Workshops

Select one four-day morning workshop or two different two-day morning workshops.

10:15 a.m.- 12:15 p.m.

Off the Page!
With an emphasis on speech performance, this workshop strives for preaching that is oral/aural, visual, contextual, and faithful to the gospel. Particular attention will be given to writing for the ear, preaching with and without a manuscript, voice, visual engagement, gesture/body movement, and improvisational speech. Participants are to come prepared to preach a beginning, a story or experience, and an ending from one or different sermons. Michael Brothers
Enrollment capped at 9 Fellows.

Empowering the Voice of the Female Preacher
This workshop focuses on the woman’s physical speaking voice. The voice is a full-body instrument. But many women preachers struggle to speak because we are disconnected from our own bodies and because we have trouble claiming our voices in the pulpit. Through interactive practicum, discussion and mutual support, this workshop will enable women to increase the effectiveness of their public speaking voices. Nancy Gross

Preaching as a Ministry of the Whole Congregation
Preaching is an ecclesial practice that belongs to the whole congregation and not only to the preacher. This workshop aims to equip you to equip all the baptized to fulfill their roles as proclaimers of God’s good news. Understanding and engaging the collaborative nature of preaching will revive your preaching and your congregation’s participation. Participants will leave with concrete possibilities for engaging a collaborative preaching ministry in their own contexts. Shauna Hannan

Prophetic Preaching
“It is not that I and all the rest of us have said too much in our sermons, but rather that we have said far too little.” These words were penned by Confessing Church pastor, Paul Schneider, from his prison cell, to his wife during the period of Nazi Germany. This workshop aims to supply some context for our public witness as congregational preachers. In particular, we will ask, “How do you know when a public concern rises to the level of Sunday morning witness? How does a biblical theology of preaching inform our social witness? What makes congregational preaching on controversial issues both important and difficult?” Participants are encouraged to share struggles, tensions, and insights into the preacher’s prophetic vocation in congregational settings. Rob Hoch

Take a S.E.A.T.
This four-day workshop presents a hands-on model for weekly sermon preparation. The class will work through 4 steps of sermon preparation: Select a text, Examine the text, Answer the questions, and Tie it together with the goal of having a sermon outlined or written by the end of the course. Raquel Lettsome

10:15 a.m.- 12:15 p.m.

The Elegant Manuscript
Preaching without notes can be challenging, but preaching with notes is no small task! What makes writing for preaching distinct and more importantly, beautiful? In this workshop participants are asked to bring existing sermon manuscripts and also an outline or ideas for an upcoming sermon that we will shape toward an elegant manuscript. Gerald Liu

Preaching as a Subversive Art
The history of Christian practice is filled with examples of faithful people engaging in imaginative acts of gospel shaped resistance. This workshop will draw inspiration from the Christian history of subversion and discuss how the examples of holy subversion in the past might inform our preaching in the present. We will commune with our subversive ancestors, hear their stories, and seek guidance on what to say in a world that has always been in danger of spinning off its axis. Students will create and deliver a subversive parable that addresses their local congregational context. Adam Hearlson

10:15 a.m.- 12:15 p.m.

The Elegant Manuscript
Preaching without notes can be challenging, but preaching with notes is no small task! What makes writing for preaching distinct and more importantly, beautiful? In this workshop participants are asked to bring existing sermon manuscripts and also an outline or ideas for an upcoming sermon that we will shape toward an elegant manuscript. Gerald Liu

So They May Hear: Intercultural Communication & The Intercultural Homiletic
This Workshop is for persons interested in communicating with congregants from different cultural backgrounds. It aims to convey the importance of being able to communicate interculturally through the preached word. Exercises will aid participants in assessing their intercultural competence, recognize areas for further development and revise sermon(s) utilizing strategies for particular contexts. Some prep work is required. I. Joy-Harris

Afternoon Workshops

Select one four-day afternoon workshop or two different two-day afternoon workshops

2:00 p.m- 4:00 p.m.

Preaching the Psalms
What would it mean to preach directly from the psalms? How does the psalmic voice speak to our own age? How does it challenge our experience? What thirsts does the psalmist begin to satisfy? This workshop includes a deeper look into the psalmic worldview, yields that one might expect from a steady diet of psalmic preaching, as well as specific strategies to assist the preacher as he or she preaches the songs of Scripture. As part of the workshop, students will compose a five minute “psalmic sermon” for group discussion and reflection. Rob Hoch

2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Short Story Fiction for the Preacher
Plot, form, mood, psychic distance, setting, time; these elements of fiction can serve preachers in their craft. Through a “close reading” of a short story, brief writing exercises and an examination of one’s own sermon, participants will learn and utilize literary tools to analyze and explore possibilities for their own sermons. [Pre-work: 1) read Alice Munroe’s “Child’s Play,” 2) choose and bring to the workshop one of your recent sermons]. Shauna Hannan

Preaching as a Subversive Art
The history of Christian practice is filled with examples of faithful people engaging in imaginative acts of gospel shaped resistance. This workshop will draw inspiration from the Christian history of subversion and discuss how the examples of holy subversion in the past might inform our preaching in the present. We will commune with our subversive ancestors, hear their stories, and seek guidance on what to say in a world that has always been in danger of spinning off its axis. Students will create and deliver a subversive parable that addresses their local congregational context. Adam Hearlson

Prophetic Preaching: Are You Prepared to Die?
Preaching that names injustice and imagines change can create conflict. Prophetic preaching may sound exciting in theory, but can be challenging to live out with integrity and pastoral sensitivity. In this workshop, we will consider what it means to prepare ourselves for the task of prophetic preaching, how we understand the prophetic preaching itself, and how to live and work with the responses to prophetic preaching. Raquel Lettsome

Homiletic Scavenging
Sound Biblical interpretation is an anchor for faithful Christian preaching. And since Scripture testifies to miraculous and holy events that happened in ordinary life, how does everyday life today also reveal theological insights for our preaching now? In this workshop, we will explore the surrounding context of Princeton Theological Seminary and use all of our senses to discern what “will preach” from the ordinary gifts of God that we experience immediately before us. Gerald Liu

2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Short Story Fiction for the Preacher
Plot, form, mood, psychic distance, setting, time; these elements of fiction can serve preachers in their craft. Through a “close reading” of a short story, brief writing exercises and an examination of one’s own sermon, participants will learn and utilize literary tools to analyze and explore possibilities for their own sermons. [Pre-work: 1) read Alice Munroe’s “Child’s Play,” 2) choose and bring to the workshop one of your recent sermons]. Shauna Hannan

So They May Hear: Intercultural Communication & The Intercultural Homiletic
This Workshop is for persons interested in communicating with congregants from different cultural backgrounds. It aims to convey the importance of being able to communicate interculturally through the preached word. Exercises will aid participants in assessing their intercultural competence, recognize areas for further development and revise sermon(s) utilizing strategies for particular contexts. Some prep work is required. I. Joy Harris

Preaching as a Subversive Art

The history of Christian practice is filled with examples of faithful people engaging in imaginative acts of gospel shaped resistance. This workshop will draw inspiration from the Christian history of subversion and discuss how the examples of holy subversion in the past might inform our preaching in the present. We will commune with our subversive ancestors, hear their stories, and seek guidance on what to say in a world that has always been in danger of spinning off its axis. Students will create and deliver a subversive parable that addresses their local congregational context. Adam Hearlson

Homiletic Scavenging
Sound Biblical interpretation is an anchor for faithful Christian preaching. And since Scripture testifies to miraculous and holy events that happened in ordinary life, how does everyday life today also reveal theological insights for our preaching now? In this workshop, we will explore the surrounding context of Princeton Theological Seminary and use all of our senses to discern what “will preach” from the ordinary gifts of God that we experience immediately before us. Gerald Liu

Lodging and Site Information

The event will take place at Princeton Theological Seminary, located at 64 Mercer St., Princeton NJ 08540. Click here for a campus map.

Dormitory style accommodations are provided for Engle Fellows at no cost. Once accepted and registered for the program, Engle Fellows will receive more details about lodging arrangements. Meals, except for Wednesday dinner, are included and are provided in the Seminary dining hall.
Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) – Newark, NJ
Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) – Philadelphia, PA
Trenton-Mercer Airport (TTN) – Ewing, NJ
FROM PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (PHL)
Rental cars available

FROM TRENTON-MERCER AIRPORT (TTN)
Rental cars available

FROM NEWARK AIRPORT (EWR)
Rail service available via NJTransit’s Northeast Corridor
To Princeton Theological Seminary: At the Newark Liberty Airport, follow signs for NJTransit. When you reach the station, buy a ticket for Princeton. At the Princeton Junction station, get off the train and take the “Dinky” train into Princeton. The “Dinky” station is within 3 or 4 blocks of the PTS campus.

Parking is available on the Seminary campus and requires a parking pass. A parking pass will be sent to you in your registration confirmation.